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Table 2 Acute dysnatremias and mortality sorted by increasing serum-sodium

From: Acute Dysnatremias - a dangerous and overlooked clinical problem

Patient Sex Age Serum-sodium (mmol/l) at hospital arrival Duration of symptoms at arrival Cause Neurological signs/symptoms Treatment given Correction of s-sodium first 24 h Time to death
1 Female 27 106 30 min. Over hydration and gastroenteritis last 14 h. Coma, seizures. Hypertonic NaCl and furosemide. 21 mmol/l during 7 h. Declared brain dead 16 h after arrival.
2 Male 18 121, falling to 115 before transfer to ICU. 6 h. Water intoxication estimated to 20 L in 6 h. Nausea, headache, confusion, decreased consciousness. NaCl 9 mg/ml and mannitol. 30 mmol/l during 12 h. Derived diabetes insipidus, sepsis and DIC, died within few days.
3 Female 20 123 1–2 h. Over hydration before urinary sample, estimated to 10 L within 2–3 h. Headache, dizziness, seizures, decreased consciousness. NaCl 9 mg/ml and furosemide. 21 mmol/l during 18 h. 2 days.
4 Female 47 127 2 h and 45 min. Exercise-associated hyponatremia. Headache, vomiting, decreased consciousness (GCS 7). NaCl 9 mg/ml and 3%, also mannitol and furosemide. 16 mmol/l during 4 h. 19 h after onset of symptoms.
5 Male 41 209 4 h. Salt intoxication, drank mouthwash. Status epilepticus, coma (GCS 3). Glucose 50 mg/ml, NaCl 4,5 mg/ml and NaCl 9 mg/ml 18 mmol/l during 13 h, 27 mmol/l during 29 h. 72 h after intoxication.
6 Female 36 246 < 24 h. Salt intoxication during excorcism. Coma. NaCl 9 mg/ml, glucose 50 mg/ml and furosemide. 53 mmol/l during 7 h. Clinically brain dead 5 h after arrival.