Volume 21 Supplement 2

Proceedings of the 5th Danish Emergency Medicine Conference

Open Access

Epidemiology of moderate and severe traumatic brain injury in Cairo University Hospital in 2010

Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine201321(Suppl 2):A4

https://doi.org/10.1186/1757-7241-21-S2-A4

Published: 9 September 2013

Background

Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) is a contributing factor to approximately one third of all injury-related deaths in USA annually. Updated statistical records for TBI in Egypt are lacking. The current research is aiming for estimating the prevalence of TBI in Egypt in order to develop a comprehensive TBI prevention program.

Methods

One year period (one calendar month every quarter of 2010) descriptive epidemiological study of moderate and severe TBI cases admitted to the emergency department, Cairo main university hospital. The Data collection sheet included personal data (age, sex and residency), incident related data (cause, nature and time of injury) and both; clinical and radiological findings.

Results

Moderate and severe injuries account for 17.2% (844) of all TBI presented cases in the 4 months for the study. Male sex was predominantly affected 79% of cases. 63% of the cases were between 19 and 55 years old and the 2 main causes were fall from height (FFH) and motor vehicle collision (MVC) which account for about 64% of cases. 17% of cases were among pediatric group (1-18 years) and FFH was the leading cause with 34% followed by MVC and stuck by or against events with the same percentages (21%). Causes of moderate and severe TBI among seniors (above 60 years) were FFH (28%), MVC (24%), and Stuck by or against events (15%).

Conclusion

Traumatic brain injury is a serious public health problem in Egypt. Further data interpretation over wider periods of time should be conducted for better understanding of TBI prevalence is highly recommended to develop effective injury prevention program. Inefficient recording should raise the concern to establish an optimal system for data recording and interpreting.

Authors’ Affiliations

(1)
Cairo university hospital
(2)
King Khaled University Hospital
(3)
Shobra General Hospital

Copyright

© Montaser et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. 2013

This article is published under license to BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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