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Table 3 Patients characteristics depending on their cirrhosis history

From: Management of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in emergency departments, from bleeding symptoms to diagnosis: a prospective, multicenter, observational study

  With cirrhosis
n = 35
Without cirrhosis
n = 128
P value
Age (median [Q1–Q3]) 56 [50–67.5] 73 [56–83] 0.0006
Sex (men; n, %) 26 (74%) 69 (54%) 0.034
Initial symptoms suggesting UGB, n (%) Hematemesis 24 (69) 60 (47) 0.005
Melena 7 (20) 60 (47)
Hematochezia 1 (3) 6 (5)
Other 2 (2) 3 (9)
Exteriorized bleeding in the ED, n (%)a 21 (62) 69 (54) 0.56
Clinical features of severity, n (%)b n = 32 n = 127  
 Heart rate > 100 bpm 17 (53) 26 (20) 0.0006
 Systolic arterial pressure < 90 mmHg 9 (28) 22 (17) 0.21
 Marbling 4 (13) 3 (2) 0.031
 Altered mental status 4 (13) 2 (2) 0.015
Hemoglobin level, n (%)b < 7 g/dL 10 (29) 26 (21) 0.35
Upper endoscopy in ED, n (%)c 29 (26) 9 (29) 0.82
 Hemostatic procedured 5 (17) 5 (5) 0.036
Treatments in ED, n (%) n = 35 n = 128  
 Nasogastric tube 5 (14) 12 (9) 0.37
 Fluid administration 20 (57) 38 (30) 0.005
 Transfusion 16 (46) 50 (39) 0.56
 Proton pump inhibitors 28 (80) 93 (73) 0.51
 Vasopressors 23 (66) 10 (8) <0.0001
 Catecholamines 2 (6) 1 (1) 0.12
 Antibioticsc (excluding erythromycin) 4 (13) 2 (2) 0.020
 Vitamin K antagonist reversal 0 19 (15) 0.027
 Erythromycin 6 (17) 9 (7) 0.09
Final diagnosise (hospitalized patients), n (%) Ulcer 2 (6) 38 (37) <0.0001
Gastritis 3 (9) 12 (12)
Variceal bleeding 25 (74) 1 (1)
Esophagitis 2 (6) 9 (9)
Mallory-Weiss tear 0 6 (6)
Cancer 0 12 (12)
Lower GI bleeding 0 6 (6)
None 2 (6) 19 (18)
  1. afor 161 of 163 patients
  2. bfor 159 of 163 patients
  3. cfor 143 of 163 patients
  4. dfor 141 of 163 patients
  5. efor 137 of 163 patients