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Table 3 Clinical outcomes of patients who underwent preperitoneal pelvic packing (N = 14)

From: Preperitoneal pelvic packing in patients with hemodynamic instability due to severe pelvic fracture: early experience in a Korean trauma center

Variables N (range)
Duration of ER stay (min) 107.8 ± 47.5
Time to PPP (min) (overall) 60.5 (15 – 501)
Time to emergent PPP (min) a 55.4 ± 28.6
Time to emergency angiography (min) 77.8 ± 37.9
Lowest systolic blood pressure before PPP (mmHg) 71.6 ± 9.8
Lowest hemoglobin before PPP (g/dL) 9.4 ± 1.9
Lactate before PPP 4.9 ± 2.8
Systolic blood pressure after PPP (mmHg) 132.2 ± 36.4
Hemoglobin after PPP (g/dL) 10.0 ± 1.8
Lactate after PPP 7.3 ± 3.6
Red blood cell transfusion in the ER (units) 5.5 (2–44)
Fresh frozen plasma transfusion in the ER (units) 4.5 (0–30)
Red blood cell transfusion requirement before trauma intensive care unit admission (units) 11.7 ± 9.2
Fresh frozen plasma transfusion requirement before trauma intensive care unit admission (units) 6.6 ± 5.9
Red blood cell transfusion requirement in the trauma intensive care unit (units/ 24 hours) 8.6 ± 5.5
Fresh frozen plasma transfusion requirement in the trauma intensive care unit (units/24 hours) 7.4 ± 4.7
Time from PPP to tape removal (hours) 60.8 ± 20.9
Duration of mechanical ventilation 9.4 ± 5.8
Duration of trauma intensive care unit stay (days) 14.0 ± 9.4
Mortality (d/t acute hemorrhage) 2 (14.3 %)
All mortality 5 (35.7 %)
  1. ER emergency room, PPP preperitoneal pelvic packing
  2. a Ten patients who underwent PPP as emergency operation