Skip to main content

Table 1 Demographic and clinical characteristics by presence of abnormal traditional vital signs (TVS) and elevated venous lactate*

From: A retrospective analysis of geriatric trauma patients: venous lactate is a better predictor of mortality than traditional vital signs

Variable, % (n) Abnormal TVS (n=93)† Lactate ≥ 2.5 mM (n=332) missing (n)
Abnormal TVS† 100 (93) 9.64 (32) 16
Lactate ≥ 2.5 mM 39.02 (32) 100 (332) 489
Mortality 13.98 (13) 12.05 (40) 0
Blunt mechanism 96.74 (89) 97.89 (325) 10
Female gender 49.46 (46) 48.49 (161) 0
Advanced age ≥ 85 20.43 (19) 25.30 (84) 0
ISS ≥ 16 38.89 (35) 27.58 (91) 29
GCS 3 - 8 22.58 (21) 15.06 (50) 27
Respiratory rate < 10 or > 29 6.82 (6) 3.79 (12) 62
Trauma team activation 53.76 (50) 40.66 (135) 0
Cause    0
  Fall 65.59 (61) 64.16 (213)  
  Motor vehicle 23.66 (22) 23.49 (78)  
ED disposition:    7
  Intensive care unit 37.63 (35) 47.29 (157)  
  Floor 31.18 (29) 35.24 (117)  
Discharge disposition:    1
LTAC/SNF/rehabilitation 65.59 (61) 46.69 (155)  
  Home 17.20 (16) 33.73 (112)  
  1. ISS, injury severity score; GCS, glasgow coma scale; ED, emergency department; LTAC, long term acute care; SNF, skilled nursing facility.
  2. *There were 11 patients who had both abnormal TVS and elevated venous lactate.
  3. †Abnormal TVS: Systolic blood pressure < 90 mm Hg and/or heart rate > 120 beats/min.